Check This Out: Waiting For Lightning
From GQ's Cole Louison:


Danny Way isn’t the only great skateboarder with a troubled past, but he is the only skateboarder with a troubled past whose jumped the Great Wall of China. The fantastic new documentary Waiting For Lightning explores themes of obsession, grace, and physical agony through the lens of skateboarding’s most extreme athlete by delving into his mind, body, and extraordinarily troubled past. But nothing we learn lessens the impact of what we see: A 34-year-old flying 55 mph off a ramp of his own design, or a 14-surgery veteran falling 27 feet to clip his shins on the metal lip of a two-story ramp, then get up and try again, or a snarling blonde teenager melding microfine technical maneuvers with huge aerials over an empty pool’s wall. Written by Harvard professor Bret Anthony Johnston, the film includes interviews Tony Hawk, Travis Pastrana, and many doctors.
Opens today.


Check the trailer out here.
Check This Out: Waiting For Lightning

From GQ's Cole Louison:

Danny Way isn’t the only great skateboarder with a troubled past, but he is the only skateboarder with a troubled past whose jumped the Great Wall of China. The fantastic new documentary Waiting For Lightning explores themes of obsession, grace, and physical agony through the lens of skateboarding’s most extreme athlete by delving into his mind, body, and extraordinarily troubled past. But nothing we learn lessens the impact of what we see: A 34-year-old flying 55 mph off a ramp of his own design, or a 14-surgery veteran falling 27 feet to clip his shins on the metal lip of a two-story ramp, then get up and try again, or a snarling blonde teenager melding microfine technical maneuvers with huge aerials over an empty pool’s wall. Written by Harvard professor Bret Anthony Johnston, the film includes interviews Tony Hawk, Travis Pastrana, and many doctors.

Opens today.

Check the trailer out here.

Stuff We Like: Bones Brigade: An Autobiography

Sometime around 1980, a 21-year-old Santa Monican named Stacy Peralta partnered with a Stanford engineer named George Powell to form a company that coincided with America’s new interest in the hateful sport of skateboarding. Powell-Peralta needed a team of riders and Peralta, a former pro, wanted young talent he could both independently nurture and collectively shape into a lasting and dominant group of the best skaters in the world. The result was the Bones Brigade, the most-famous, most-influential, sometimes most-troubled team in the fifty-year history of a sport that’s now worth $8 billon. His selections included a rural Floridian math prodigy and an inland California kid with size 13 feet whose only other interest was the violin—his name was Tony. Peralta’s now an established filmmaker (Riding Giants, Dogtown and Z-Boys [his old team]) and he’s brought together the team and a few skateheads you might recognize (Ben Harper, Shepard Fairey) to tell their story. Narrated with interviews over gorgeous archival footage and photos, Bones Brigade: An Autobiography is an unexpectedly personal and emotional look at a time when youth and raw talent shaped a sport still in embryo.- COLE LOUISON

Check it out and pre-order here.
Stuff We Like: Bones Brigade: An Autobiography

Sometime around 1980, a 21-year-old Santa Monican named Stacy Peralta partnered with a Stanford engineer named George Powell to form a company that coincided with America’s new interest in the hateful sport of skateboarding. Powell-Peralta needed a team of riders and Peralta, a former pro, wanted young talent he could both independently nurture and collectively shape into a lasting and dominant group of the best skaters in the world. The result was the Bones Brigade, the most-famous, most-influential, sometimes most-troubled team in the fifty-year history of a sport that’s now worth $8 billon. His selections included a rural Floridian math prodigy and an inland California kid with size 13 feet whose only other interest was the violin—his name was Tony. Peralta’s now an established filmmaker (Riding Giants, Dogtown and Z-Boys [his old team]) and he’s brought together the team and a few skateheads you might recognize (Ben Harper, Shepard Fairey) to tell their story. Narrated with interviews over gorgeous archival footage and photos, Bones Brigade: An Autobiography is an unexpectedly personal and emotional look at a time when youth and raw talent shaped a sport still in embryo.
- COLE LOUISON

Check it out and pre-order here.

Fashion Week? It’s Also Thrashin’ Week!
A dispatch from GQ’s resident skater historian Cole Louison (whose kickass definitive history of skateboarding, The Impossible, is a must-read, but that’s a whole other subject):

Much as we celebrate Fashion Week, it has also fueled a pretty creative anti-culture. The celebrities, the paparazzi, the self-appointed security guiding sidewalk traffic while we try and get to work—there’s a lot to grumble about. But this year things seem to have reached a head. Maybe Anna’s entourage cut off the wrong people, or everyone’s still seething about 2010’s lumberjacking at Lincoln Center—and doesn’t that fucking tent gets bigger and more permanent-looking every year?—but for the first time a group of notable Uptowners have mobilized to launch a counter-event. Introducing Thrashin’ Week: a celebration of edgy music, counterculture, and all things decidely not FW. Held at the swank Stone Rose Lounge by Lincoln Center, within gawking distance of the great white tents, the event is a brainchild of nightlife gurus Gerber Group and energy drink Godhead Red Bull, who have erected a full-scale skateboard ramp INSIDE the lounge. Pro skaters will give demos and host clinics, with music by Motion City Soundtrack, London Souls, Terry Urban, and more. Events are open to the public. Leave your snakeskin boots at home.
Fashion Week? It’s Also Thrashin’ Week!

A dispatch from GQ’s resident skater historian Cole Louison (whose kickass definitive history of skateboarding, The Impossible, is a must-read, but that’s a whole other subject):

Much as we celebrate Fashion Week, it has also fueled a pretty creative anti-culture. The celebrities, the paparazzi, the self-appointed security guiding sidewalk traffic while we try and get to work—there’s a lot to grumble about. But this year things seem to have reached a head. Maybe Anna’s entourage cut off the wrong people, or everyone’s still seething about 2010’s lumberjacking at Lincoln Center—and doesn’t that fucking tent gets bigger and more permanent-looking every year?—but for the first time a group of notable Uptowners have mobilized to launch a counter-event. Introducing Thrashin’ Week: a celebration of edgy music, counterculture, and all things decidely not FW. Held at the swank Stone Rose Lounge by Lincoln Center, within gawking distance of the great white tents, the event is a brainchild of nightlife gurus Gerber Group and energy drink Godhead Red Bull, who have erected a full-scale skateboard ramp INSIDE the lounge. Pro skaters will give demos and host clinics, with music by Motion City Soundtrack, London Souls, Terry Urban, and more. Events are open to the public. Leave your snakeskin boots at home.