Breitbart In Full: The GQ+A
Why does a seemingly healthy man die of natural causes at the age of 43? The sudden death of Andrew Breitbart earlier this week remains a medical mystery. But the moment we heard the news, we thought back to this portion of GQ correspondent Lisa DePaulo’s lengthy, free-wheeling interview with Breitbart almost exactly a year ago. It captures a man who seems to thrive off a constant state of information overload, who’s happiest when his engine is revving into the red. For many readers, the Breitbart who reveals himself in this interview is a maddening figure—but he sure was entertaining. That brief exchange is below. The full interview is here.

You write about having had ADD all your life. Do you take anything  for it? No. The Internet was the thing that focused me. It was not  Ritalin.
I would imagine having ADD is not a negative thing for an Internet  entrepreneur. No, it’s not a negative thing. It’s a huge, huge net positive.
What does ADD feels like when you’re in front of your computer? I’ve got maybe 4 or 5 instant messenger conversations going on  at the same time. I’ve got about 5 or 6 apps in Firefox going on. I’m  probably talking on my cell phone while I’m monitoring my fantasy  baseball team, knowing the pitch count of the Milwaukee  Brewers-Cincinnati Reds game. But I’m also on my iPad when I’m on a  plane. And there is no level of disappointment in my life greater than  getting to the jack and not seeing the wireless sign. I would rather be  in steerage with wireless. In the middle seat. Than in first class with  the Air Singapore stewardess massaging my toes.
Where do you think you would be today if there wasn’t an Internet? Boy. That’s the scariest thought in the world.
Breitbart In Full: The GQ+A

Why does a seemingly healthy man die of natural causes at the age of 43? The sudden death of Andrew Breitbart earlier this week remains a medical mystery. But the moment we heard the news, we thought back to this portion of GQ correspondent Lisa DePaulo’s lengthy, free-wheeling interview with Breitbart almost exactly a year ago. It captures a man who seems to thrive off a constant state of information overload, who’s happiest when his engine is revving into the red. For many readers, the Breitbart who reveals himself in this interview is a maddening figure—but he sure was entertaining. That brief exchange is below. The full interview is here.

You write about having had ADD all your life. Do you take anything for it?
No. The Internet was the thing that focused me. It was not Ritalin.

I would imagine having ADD is not a negative thing for an Internet entrepreneur.
No, it’s not a negative thing. It’s a huge, huge net positive.

What does ADD feels like when you’re in front of your computer?
I’ve got maybe 4 or 5 instant messenger conversations going on at the same time. I’ve got about 5 or 6 apps in Firefox going on. I’m probably talking on my cell phone while I’m monitoring my fantasy baseball team, knowing the pitch count of the Milwaukee Brewers-Cincinnati Reds game. But I’m also on my iPad when I’m on a plane. And there is no level of disappointment in my life greater than getting to the jack and not seeing the wireless sign. I would rather be in steerage with wireless. In the middle seat. Than in first class with the Air Singapore stewardess massaging my toes.

Where do you think you would be today if there wasn’t an Internet?
Boy. That’s the scariest thought in the world.

Andrew Breitbart on Sarah Palin: "I Think the Presidency Is Beneath Her"

Your book jacket says that you’re “one of the most polarizing figures  of our time.” That’s a compliment?  Yes. The media is dominated by people who disagree with American  exceptionalism—the academic Marxist crowd’s worldview—and somebody  needed to start taking it on directly. The Right has focused its energy  and money on the political process, and it just kind of shrugged off  culture. But culture is everything in this country. Once you get  down to the political level, you’ve already lost the battle. I sleep so  well at night taking these people who I’ve isolated as the problem. It’s  not Nancy Pelosi and Barack Obama. It’s Katie Couric, Brian Williams.  It’s Paramount and Sony and the people in Hollywood who hide their  message in art. And that’s why it’s so potent—
I only have 1000 words, honey.  I’m sorry. I get riled up.

For our money, no one in the business is better at these interviews that GQ’s Lisa DePaulo, who toys with spoke with right-wing web-media mogul Andrew Breitbart for this month’s issue. Click through for the full Q+A, including Breitbart’s thoughts on Planned Parenthood, his cure for ADD and why liberals have lousy radio shows.
Andrew Breitbart on Sarah Palin:
"I Think the Presidency Is Beneath Her"

Your book jacket says that you’re “one of the most polarizing figures of our time.” That’s a compliment?
Yes. The media is dominated by people who disagree with American exceptionalism—the academic Marxist crowd’s worldview—and somebody needed to start taking it on directly. The Right has focused its energy and money on the political process, and it just kind of shrugged off culture. But culture is everything in this country. Once you get down to the political level, you’ve already lost the battle. I sleep so well at night taking these people who I’ve isolated as the problem. It’s not Nancy Pelosi and Barack Obama. It’s Katie Couric, Brian Williams. It’s Paramount and Sony and the people in Hollywood who hide their message in art. And that’s why it’s so potent—

I only have 1000 words, honey.
I’m sorry. I get riled up.

For our money, no one in the business is better at these interviews that GQ’s Lisa DePaulo, who toys with spoke with right-wing web-media mogul Andrew Breitbart for this month’s issue. Click through for the full Q+A, including Breitbart’s thoughts on Planned Parenthood, his cure for ADD and why liberals have lousy radio shows.